Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Monday, June 20, 2011

draw manga

How to Draw Manga is a series of instructional books on drawing manga published by Graphic-sha, by a variety of authors. Originally in Japanese for the Japanese market, many volumes have been translated into English and published in the US. Of the wide range of manga-how-tos available for westerners, the series is seen as one of the more useful, both for its provenance and wide range of practical tips.[1] The English-language volumes in the series were co-produced by Graphic-sha and two other Japanese companies, Japanime Co. Ltd. and Japan Publications Trading Co.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] List of books in the series

This is a list of books in the main HTDM set and other sets that relate to the main series.

[edit] How to Draw Manga

Originally there were no volume numbers on the English versions, because the original Japanese version did not have them. Then only volumes 1 - 8 were given numbers. With continued reprints and more books being released, all volumes gained a number. The dates given are the first printing. Several of these books have been discontinued, and are considered hard to find.

  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 1: Compiling Characters (October 1999)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 2: Compiling Techniques (July 2000)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 3: Compiling Application and Practice (August 2000)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 4: Dressing Your Characters in Casual Wear (May 2001)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 5: Developing Shoujo Manga Techniques (July 2002)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 6: Martial Arts & Combat Sports (June 2002)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 7: Amazing Effects (June 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 8: Super Basics (June 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 9: Special: Colored Original Drawing (May 2001)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 10: Getting Started (October 2000)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 11: Maids & Miko (November 2002)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 12: Giant Robots (February 2002)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 13: Super Tone Techniques (August 2002)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 14: Colorful Costumes (January 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 15: Girls' Life Illustration File (May 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 16: Guns & Military Vol. 1 (September 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 17: Guns & Military Vol. 2 (October 2004)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 18: Super-Deformed Characters Vol. 1 Humans (August 2004)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 19: Super-Deformed Characters Vol. 2 Animals (June 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 20: Female Characters (December 1999)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 21: Bishoujo Pretty Gals (November 2000)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 22: Bishoujo Around the World (March 2001)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 23: Illustrating Battles (October 2000)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 24: Occult & Horror (June 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 25: Bodies & Anatomy (December 2001)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 26: Making Anime (January 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 27: Male Characters (July 2002)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 28: Couples (January 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 29: Putting Things in Perspective (October 2002)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 30: Pen & Tone Techniques (April 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 31: More about Pretty Gals (August 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 32: Mech. Drawing (December 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 33: Costume Encyclopedia Vol. 1 Everyday Fashion (December 2003)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 34: Costume Encyclopedia Vol. 2 Intimate Apparel (January 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 35: Costume Encyclopedia Vol. 3: Sexy Sports Wear (May 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 36: Animals (February 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 37: Macromedia Flash Techniques (February 2004)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 38: Ninja & Samurai Portrayal (September 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 39: Creating Manga: Stories (April 2007)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 40: Dressing Your Characters In Suits & Sailor Suits (August 2006)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 41: Costume Encyclopedia Vol. 4 Kimono & Gowns (April 2007)
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 42: Drawing Yaoi (June 2007) Note: this is a bishōnen how-to guide, not yaoi
  • How to Draw Manga Vol. 43: Drawing Bishōnen (December 2008)

[edit] How to Draw Manga: Ultimate Manga Lessons

This set was printed in a smaller format of 15 cm x 21 cm.

  • How to Draw Manga: Ultimate Manga Lessons Vol. 1: Drawing Made Easy (April 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga: Ultimate Manga Lessons Vol. 2: The Basics of Characters and Materials (August 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga: Ultimate Manga Lessons Vol. 3: Drawing Sensational Characters (November 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga: Ultimate Manga Lessons Vol. 4: Making the Characters Come Alive (March 2006)
  • How to Draw Manga: Ultimate Manga Lessons Vol. 5: A Touch of Dynamism (2006)
  • How to Draw Manga: Ultimate Manga Lessons Vol. 6: Striking the Right Note (August 2006)

[edit] How to Draw Manga: Computones

Each volume in this set includes a CD-ROM for use with Windows only.

  • How to Draw Manga: Computones Vol. 1: Basic Tone Techniques (May 2005) :0
  • How to Draw Manga: Computones Vol. 2: Depicting Characters (September 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga: Computones Vol. 3: Mecha (October 2005)
  • How to Draw Manga: Computones Vol. 4: Portraying Couples (June 2006)
  • How to Draw Manga: Computones Vol. 5: Aiming For Action (June 2006)

[edit] How to Draw Manga: Sketching Manga-Style

  • How to Draw Manga: Sketching Manga-Style Vol. 1: Sketching to Plan (February 2007)
  • How to Draw Manga: Sketching Manga-Style Vol. 2: Logical Proportions (April 2007)
  • How to Draw Manga: Sketching Manga-Style Vol. 3: Unforgettable Characters (October 2007)
  • How to Draw Manga: Sketching Manga-Style Vol. 4: All About Perspective (Nov 12, 2008)
  • How to Draw Manga: Sketching Manga-Style Vol. 5: Sketching Sports Basics (Dec 10, 2008)
  • How to Draw Manga: Sketching Manga-Style Vol. 6: Sketching Props (August 11, 2009)

[edit] Manga Pose Resource Book

This set was printed in an over-sized format of 21 cm x 29.6 cm.

  • Manga Pose Resource Book Vol. 1: Basic Poses (2002)
  • Manga Pose Resource Book Vol. 2: Animals (2002)
  • Manga Pose Resource Book Vol. 3: Actions Scenes (2002)

[edit] How to Draw Anime and Game Characters

This set is another Graphic-Sha publication that is shown alongside the main HTDM series on the dustjacks and in ads.

  • How to Draw Anime and Game Characters Vol. 1: Basics for Beginners and Beyond (August 2000)
  • How to Draw Anime and Game Characters Vol. 2: Expressing Emotions (March 2001)
  • How to Draw Anime and Game Characters Vol. 3: Bringing Daily Actions to Life (August 2001)
  • How to Draw Anime and Game Characters Vol. 4: Mastering Battle and Action Moves (April 2002)
  • How to Draw Anime and Game Characters Vol. 5: Bishoujo Game Characters (September 2003)

[edit] More How to Draw Manga

Another set of manga-know-how with only four volumes, based in character creation. Note: Only three of the first printings for this series are below.

  • More How to Draw Manga Vol. 1: The Basics of Character Drawing (March 2004)
  • More How to Draw Manga Vol. 2: Penning Characters (March 2004)
  • More How to Draw Manga Vol. 3: Enhancing a Character's Sense of Presence (??? 2004)
  • More How to Draw Manga Vol. 4: Mastering Bishoujo Characters (September 2004)

[edit] Cancelled/Status Unknown Volumes

These are volumes that were going to be released in English and even advertised for ordering, but they have been cancelled.

  • How to Draw Manga: Digital Comic Guide Vol. 1

[edit] Cross-promotions

A special edition of the series titled How to Draw Manga Special: Colored Original Drawing was produced detailing how to use Copic markers. It explains how to avoid blotches, use colorless blenders, select paper, refill markers, changing nibs and the airbrush system.

Monday, May 19, 2008

Sunday, May 11, 2008

how to draw manga

Interesting post here..i really agree with what u say and i'm looking forward to do my research as well...keep on the good work as usual ... this blog rules !!!
The term ‘manga,’ meaning ‘irresponsible pictures', was first coined by Hokusai, the famous Japanese artist. The production of popular comic books and pictures of everyday life emerged in Japan early in the 19th Century and flourished into the 20th.
It has been adapted easily to the medium of film and become ‘anime,’ the moving-picture branch of manga. The first animated features in Japan were produced in the 1930s and 1940s, but the futuristic fantasy films we know today as anime emerged in the 1950s and owe much to the experience of Japan during and immediately after the Second World War.

The emphasis on the romantic adventure story and on science fiction, coupled with themes such as Armageddon, death and destruction and rebirth through sacrifice and unselfishness, reflect the trauma of Japan’s near-destruction during the Second World War and its adoption of new technology enhanced by a dedication to rebuild the shattered nation.

The ever-present fear of a devastating earthquake, which remains an imminent threat, also contributes to the preoccupation with the post-apocalyptic wilderness.
Anime first made its mark in the UK with the release of Akira in 1991 and since then has become a boom industry, with an increasing number of distributors marketing this material, the biggest being Manga and Kiseki.

To a large extent, anime is the triumph of form over content, though often the non-linear narrative allows complex themes to be explored. To many non-Japanese, cultural barriers prevent any deep understanding of the underlying themes and imagery.
Many anime fans watch for the spectacular animation and the breathtaking leaps of imagination. Who needs an understandable storyline when you are being taken on a high-tech mystery tour of a far-off galaxy?

The result of the above is that anime sometimes appears to have little respect for the boundaries of taste and decency. Graphic violence, sex and sexual violence often appear within a medium which, in our western experience, has traditionally been free from such incursions.
Adult themes are starting to be explored through animation in western animated films (the backstory of O-Ren in Tarantino’s Kill Bill is a good example), but this is largely as a result of Japanese influence and ‘cartoons’ are still often seen as a children’s format.
A great deal of anime would seem to appeal to a young audience, populated as it is by teen and pre-teen characters, furry fantasy creatures and robots. However, there is sometimes a mismatch between the theme and the presentation and appeal, and this has presented difficulties for the BBFC.

Some of the most problematic anime works for the board have been those in which children are presented as sexually active. The characters in anime works are often presented as childlike, with their big eyes and high voices. They can change form according to their mood and a character that appears adult in one scene can look like a toddler in the next. Sometimes the only way to tell which character is which is through the consistent nature of their hair colour and style.

In addition to their childlike features, characters are often presented in school uniform, which usually takes the form of a sailor-style top and shorts or a mini-skirt. Until relatively recently, Japanese university students were required to wear uniform and it is sometimes the case that these uniformed characters are actually supposed to be at college.
However, there is a clear link between school uniforms and the notion of underage sex and the Board is always mindful of this when making classification decisions. Cuts have occasionally been written at '18' for such content.
For example, in the series LA Blue Girl Returns, characters presented as children (dressed in uniforms, physically small) are explicitly involved in sexual activity. It was felt that the link could potentially encourage an interest in underage sex and these scenes were removed.

Other scenes in the same work were removed due to their focus on sexual violence. Women are penetrated by a tentacled beast in explicit detail and, again, we felt these scenes contravened our guidelines. Such ‘tentacle rape’ scenes are a feature of a branch of anime known as hentai, a Japanese term meaning ‘strange appearance.’ The term has come to be used to describe pornographic anime works.
As a form of expressing sexual fantasy, hentai works can include depictions that are deemed unacceptable by society, or run counter to social norms. Such fantasies are often depicted in the extreme, demonstrating subconscious desires or purely carnal motivations.
Sexuality or sexual violence is often perpetrated by fantasy creatures or by humans with abnormal anatomy. Despite the fact that this sexual activity is drawn, the Board treats these explicit works as it would live-action sex and explicit detail has been removed or pushed up to the R18 category.
Examples of works which have been cut for sexual detail include Mission of Darkness and Alien of Darkness. Both these works were also cut for instances of sexual violence, which very often goes hand-in-hand with explicit sexual content. A further work in the same series, Sex Beast – Idol of Darkness, was rejected as there was barely any salvageable material once the explicit sex and sexual violence were removed.

Despite these examples, cut works remain a very small percentage of the anime product which comes through the Board. Most works are passed at the '12' category, perfect for Manga Entertainment’s stated target market, ’12-19 year old British males.


Find out more:
BBFC Guidelines